Blog Archives: July 2011

Gain the insider insight you need to enter your medical residency program of choice.

How to Land the Residency You Really Want with Better Letters of Recommendation

Did you ever get a generic letter of recommendation from an absent-minded attending? I imagine it read like the form letter s/he signs for all of his capable students. If you received one of these, it likely made the pit of your stomach churn. Imagine what the reaction will be when your residency program of choice opens it.

You likely don’t want to think about it. Let’s face it, generic doesn’t make the cut.

A maximum of four letters of recommendation can be submitted by you. It’s not required, though helpful, to obtain the majority of letters of recommendation from your specialty. As your residency application specialist, I can help you do the following:

  • Ask the right people for the right kinds of letters.

 

  • Encourage clear, precise letters of recommendation.

 

  • Follow-up with those who have written in your favour.

 

  • Determine the best timeline for recommending you.

 

Besides getting good letters of recommendation, you need to know how to ensure you have the right mix of glowing recommendations to land your residency of choice.

I’m Donald T. Morrish, MD. I’ll help you throughout the process—from asking for those make-or-break letters of recommendation to matching to the program you really want.

For residency application advice, send me a message or call me toll-free: (888) 549-8111.

How to Land the Residency You Really Want with Better Letters of Recommendation

What the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP) Means to You

The National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) will soon implement the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP). This program will replace the scramble for unfilled positions during Match Week 2012. Read the details from AAMC.

This is the result of joint-task force of medical school student affairs deans, residency program directors and graduates of U.S. and international medical schools. For more than two years, their feedback was collected by NRMP and AAMC to implement SOAP.

What does the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program mean to you?

 

Your application matters twice. Your medical residency application is used for both 2012 Match consideration and—if you don’t match any medical residency programs—2012 SOAP.

Make it count, because it counts twice. If a typo-laden personal statement or poorly written content doesn’t get someone’s attention for 2012 Match, it’s not going to work for 2012 SOAP.

There are no second chances on first impressions. Make sure all your ERAS® Application content—quality of answers, letters of recommendation and supporting documents—read well.

How do you clean up your pitch before you have to settle on 2012 SOAP?

 

Consider editing services from a qualified medical residency program expert. I’m Donald T. Morrish, MD. I’m a former Associate Program Director. I know exactly what it takes.

Clean up your application before you have to rely on SOAP. Before you submit it, send me a message or call me toll-free: (888) 549-8111.

What the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP) Means to You